October 20, 2011 / Leave a comment / Permalink

Important change to kerbside cardboard collection service

Related topics: Community / My area

As from 28 November 2011, cardboard can no longer be collected as part of the garden waste collection service.

Changes to national composting regulations mean that cardboard can no longer be mixed with garden waste in a move designed to improve the quality of compost for the gardening market.

The standard, developed by the Waste and Resources Action Programme and composting industry, says cardboard mixed with garden waste has the potential to cause contamination through inks, dyes and plastic coatings.

The new rules mean that Veolia Environmental Services, Shropshire Council’s waste contractor, will no longer be able to collect garden waste mixed with cardboard. This means that from the end of November householders in the Shropshire Council area cannot put cardboard in their garden waste bins or sacks as the compost producers will no longer accept garden waste which contains cardboard.

To inform householders of this change, a leaflet will be put under the lids of all rubbish bins from the end of October 2011.  A permanent sticker will then be put on garden waste bin lids to act as a reminder to residents not to put cardboard in.

Mike Owen, Shropshire Council’s Cabinet member with responsibility for waste and recycling, said:

“We’re really disappointed with this change as it means we will have to change a system which has successfully reduced the amount of waste going to landfill in the county over the last few years.

“The changes in regulations being imposed at a national level will undoubtedly cause some inconvenience.  However, residents can continue to recycle their cardboard by taking it to one of our Household Recycling Centres.”

The council, alongside its waste contractor Veolia, is currently exploring ways to collect cardboard from the kerbside in the future.

Donald Macphail, managing director of Veolia Shropshire, said:

“We are committed to finding new ways of collecting cardboard so that this material can continue to be recycled from the kerbside and are working with Shropshire Council to explore different ways of collecting cardboard in the future. We also plan to carry out some trials in certain parts of the county in the New Year.” 

In the meantime, to help householders recycle their cardboard, around 20 recycling banks, currently accepting plastic bottles, will be converted into cardboard recycling banks.

The council’s garden waste kerbside collection service receives approximately 38,000 tonnes every year from the collection of garden waste, cardboard and food waste from 131,000 homes across the county.  Cardboard represents 4,000 tonnes of this, which is approximately 10 per cent.

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