Shropshire Council

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Factsheet 6: Care Act assessment

 

Factsheet 6 - PDF version

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What is an assessment?

We use an assessment to decide whether a person needs care and support to help them live their day-to-day life. The aim is to get a full picture of the person, and what needs and goals they may have. After carrying out the assessment, we'll then consider whether any of the needs identified are eligible for support.

I'd like an assessment, so what happens next?

When you, or someone on your behalf, first contacts us you're likely to speak to the First Point of Contact Team, and you'll be asked some key questions about your personal details and the circumstances you're in. You'll also be asked if you need support to continue with the conversation, and whether you know of someone who can provide this support. Alternative forms of support are available if you can't identify a suitable person.

Having spoken to you and establishing that an assessment is required, First Point of Contact will either arrange an appointment for you to attend a Let’s Talk Local session in your local community or, depending on your circumstances, you may be visited at home.

How do I prepare for my assessment?

Begin by thinking about what's working well for you at the moment and why these things are working well. Also, consider what it is you need to achieve to improve your wellbeing, and what could be in place to enable this to happen. For example, if you have difficulties meeting your personal care needs, what would make a difference? Have you tried using equipment/aids?

We'll work through your assessment with you to establish whether you have eligible needs and outcomes that are currently not being achieved. The outcomes we'll focus on are detailed on the last page, which is a summary of the eligibility criteria. When deciding which needs and outcomes are eligible, we'll establish what the actual barriers are to achieving these so that we can ensure that we tackle such barriers.

Who will be involved in my assessment?

One of our social care practitioners will be responsible for completing the assessment with you, and they'll also liaise with other professionals who may be involved in your care and support, such as a district nurse or your GP. You may want to have a family member present to support you through the assessment process too.

What will my assessment include/cover?

The assessment will identify your needs across ten outcomes which are set out in legislation, and will detail what the barriers are to you achieving these outcomes. It will also identify any health and safety concerns so that the necessary support can be put in place to keep you safe.

If you have support from a family member or friend, their input will be noted in the assessment, but will be disregarded when making a decision on your eligibility. So although a particular outcome may be identified as being eligible, where you receive support from a family member or friend it will be assessed as a need that is currently being met.

What happens if I'm a carer?

Carers have the same opportunity as those needing support to have a full assessment of their needs. The assessment process itself is much the same but the eligibility is slightly different. Please refer to the summary of eligibility at the end of this factsheet.

Find more information for carers in Factsheet 5: Support for carers

How is a decision made on whether I'm eligible for support?

There are three stages to determining your eligibility for care and support, which are nationally set and detailed in the summary of eligibility at the end of this factsheet.

Stages 1 and 2 are specifically related to your identified needs and outcomes that can't be achieved. Stage 3 is where we measure the impact of such needs and outcomes, and decide whether there is or is likely to be a significant impact on your wellbeing.

We'll use the information that you provide during your assessment, information provided by professionals that may be involved and our own judgement to make this determination. You'll receive a copy of your assessment and have the opportunity to challenge a decision made on your eligibility by calling 0345 678 9044.

Data protection

Everyone's personal information is protected by the Data Protection Act. This gives you the right to see your own information and ensures that your information is protected from being seen by people who shouldn't see it.

We make sure that the information we keep about you is:

  • Relevant - we only collect information that we need in order to provide you with the service you require
  • Correct - to help us do this please let us know of any change in your personal details,
    such as a change of address
  • Kept confidential - from people who don't need to see it

You have the right to see the information that we hold about you. You can make a request at any time to see this information by talking to your social care practitioner, or by completing an online form. We'll only share information about you with others when it's necessary (eg with other organisations who can support you) when you have given us your permission to do this.

1. Needs

2. Outcomes

3. Wellbeing

The needs arise as a consequence of providing necessary care to an adult, and the carer is ‘unable’ to achieve the following:

As a result of the carers needs, either:

A. the carer’s physical; or mental health is, or is at risk of, deteriorating, or

B. the carer is unable to achieve any of the following outcomes:

i. carrying out any caring responsibilities the carer has for a child;

ii. providing care to other persons for whom the carer provides care;

iii. maintaining a habitable home environment;

iv. managing and maintaining nutrition;

v. developing and maintaining family or other significant personal relationships;

vi. accessing and engaging in work, training, education or volunteering;

vii.making use of necessary facilities or services in the local community including recreational facilities or services;

viii. engaging in recreational activities

As a consequence, there is or is likely to be a significant impact on the carers wellbeing, including:

a) personal dignity
(including treatment of the individual with respect);

b) physical and mental health and emotional well-being;

c) protection from abuse and neglect;

d) control by the individual over day-to-day life (including over care and support provided and the way it is provided);

e) participation in work, education, training or recreation;

f ) social and economicwell-being;

 

1. Needs

2. Outcomes

3. Well-being

The adult’s needs arise from or are related to a physical or mental impairment or illness

As a result of the needs, the adult is unable to achieve two or more of the following:

a) managing and maintaining nutrition;

b) maintaining personal hygiene;

c) managing toilet needs;

d) being appropriately clothed;

e) maintaining a habitable home environment;

f) being able to make use of the home safely;

g) developing and maintaining family or their personal
relationships;

h) accessing and engaging in work, training, education
or volunteering;

i) making use of necessary facilities or services in the local community including public transport and recreational facilities or services;

j) carrying out any caring responsibilities the adult has for a child.

As a consequence, there is or is likely to be a significant
impact on the adult’s wellbeing, including the following:

a) personal dignity (including treatment of the individual with
respect);

b) physical and mental health and emotional well-being;

c) protection from abuse and neglect;

d) control by the individual over day-to-day life (including over care and support provided and the way it is provided);

e) participation in work, education, training or recreation;

f) social and economic well-being;

g) domestic, family and personal relationships;

h) suitability of living accommodation;

i) the individual’s contribution to society.